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Thankful to be living in the future

FOR THE MONITOR I don’t think I would have done well in 1621. I haven’t been hiking or camping in years. My shooting skills are limited to paper silhouettes. And the only fires I’ve lit recently have been in a barbecue grill or a wood pellet stove. I don’t even want to think about going through the day without ...
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News & Headlines

Thankful to be living in the future

By Grant Bosse on November 26, 2013
FOR THE MONITOR I don’t think I would have done well in 1621. I haven’t been hiking or camping in years. My shooting skills are limited to paper silhouettes. And the only fires I’ve lit recently have been in a barbecue grill or a wood pellet stove. I don’t even want to think about going through the day without hot and cold running water. The Pilgrims of Plymouth who survived two months at sea and a brutal New England winter celebrated their first harvest in the autumn of 1621, inviting the nearby Wampanoag tribe for a feast of thanksgiving. The Pilgrims likely went out “fowling” for local ducks, while the Wampanoag brought several deer. The meals would have likely included squash, onions, cabbage, shellfish and a mashed corn porridge known as samp. Following the feast, the Detroit Lions began an annual tradition by losing by three touchdowns.Read More>>

A Tribute to Ray Burton

By Grant Bosse on November 22, 2013
A video tribute to Executive Councilor Ray Burton, prepared for the 3rd Annual Libertas Awards Dinner by the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy. Read More>>

Voters confirm just how smart we all are

By Grant Bosse on November 13, 2013
FOR THE MONITOR On the eve of every election, I make the same prediction. No matter who wins, the overwhelming majority of political pundits will claim that the results prove that they were right all along. As we examine the results from Tuesday’s races across the country, pundits will no doubt tell us what it all [...]Read More>>

A preview of the Legislature’s not-so-special session

By Grant Bosse on November 4, 2013
FOR THE MONITOR The New Hampshire House and Senate will convene Thursday in special session, for no apparent reason. Of course, I know that the purpose of the special session is to address the thorny question of whether to expand Medicaid eligibility to low-income adults without children. But I can’t find any reason why a special session was necessary. The House and Senate didn’t need a special session to rewrite the state’s education funding formula. They just called themselves back to Concord. House and Senate leadership agree that the Medicaid question should be addressed, and each chamber has the ability to call itself back to tackle it. There was no need for the governor and Executive Council to call a special session, and their decision to do so has created needless procedural hurdles.Read More>>

Obamacare’s problems are more than just a website

By Grant Bosse on October 28, 2013
FOR THE MONITOR There’s a very easy way to tell if you’ve been the victim of one of the many scam websites that popped up this month to take advantage of people trying to sign up for Obamacare. It worked. If you’ve tried to buy insurance through HealthCare.gov, you almost certainly couldn’t log on, couldn’t enter your personal information or couldn’t get accurate pricing for your limited insurance options. President Obama says “the product is great” and that “it’s more than just a website.” But he’s scapegoating the online disaster for problems with the law that we’ve known were coming for three years.Read More>>

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Blog & Analysis

The ObamaCare Bet

By Grant Bosse on October 28, 2013
Inspired by Julian Simon, I'm searching for someone willing to lose a bet in defense of the increasingly disastrous Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Here's the bet: By January 1, 2015, the number of Americans with health insurance prior to October 1, 2013 who lose their current coverage due to employers or insurance companies discontinuing coverage will exceed the number of Americans without health insurance prior to October 1, 2013 who purchase coverage through the Exchanges set up under the Affordable Care Act. The core rationale of the health care law known as ObamaCare was that expanding coverage to uninsured Americans would fundamentally improve the overall American health care system. There were also plenty of promises of bringing down premium costs, but no one seriously believed those. President Obama also promised repeatedly that anyone happy with their current plan or doctor could keep it. That's simply not true, and never had any chance of being true. It's possible that the percentage of Americans with health insurance will be higher once the law takes effect, though even that low bar is hardly guaranteed. I find it highly unlikely that the number of Americans with the insurance they wanted will have increased. So, anyone out there disagree? I've got $100 for you if you think the newly insured will outnumber those who lose their current coverage.Read More>>

Correction in the Monitor

By Grant Bosse on August 29, 2013
The Concord Monitor runs a letter from John Parodi of Epsom correcting an error in my Sunday column recounting my grandfather's experience as a B-17 crew chief in World War II.Read More>>

Feedback- Ray Kuntz in the Concord Monitor

By Grant Bosse on July 11, 2013
Ray Kuntz from Canterbury responded to my recent Concord Monitor column on state employee contracts, by questioning why I favor incentives to limit health care consumption. Monitor Masthead
Decrying the collective bargaining process for public employee health benefits, Bosse explains: “Taxpayers are on the hook for almost every dollar, since employees pay no deductibles and nominal co-pays. This provides little incentive for workers to limit their consumption of medical services.” Incentives to limit consumption are a good idea for cigarettes; for medical services, not so much. Every other country with half a brain is operating on the idea that if it is convenient and affordable to “consume” medical services, the entire country will benefit. We are making insurance companies and hospitals rich and getting less for our money than Costa Rica.
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Business friendly: A good state budget development

By Grant Bosse on July 9, 2013
Guest Editorial in the New Hampshire Union Leader Gov. Maggie Hassan was flanked by Republican and Democratic leaders as she signed into a law a much-needed update of New Hampshire’s Business Corporation Act. There were no great ideological issues at stake. The bill brings New Hampshire government up to date on handling technical corporate practices, such as domicile and dissolution. The legislation was a top priority for the New Hampshire Business and Industry Association and was expertly guided through the State House by Republican Sen. Jeb Bradley. The new code goes into effect in January. Business owners should also be happy for a change that didn’t happen. Gov. Hassan has hoped to delay two popular tax reforms approved by the last Legislature in order to boost tax revenues in her proposed budget.Read More>>

The CON board: The beast that won’t die

By Grant Bosse on July 9, 2013
Guest Editorial in the New Hampshire Union Leader The state’s Certificate of Need board, an outdated government panel that oversees hospital construction spending, was slated to go away in 2015, but supporters of government rationing slipped a provision into the state budget deal that pushes the day of reckoning back to June 30, 2016. Officially known as the Health Services Planning and Review Board, the CON board has been around since 1979 and requires New Hampshire hospitals and clinics to get permission before building or expanding their facilities or purchasing expensive equipment. The theory is that a panel of well-intentioned bureaucrats could hold down health-care costs by preventing hospitals from reckless and wasteful expansion. It hasn’t worked.Read More>>

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